How to Speak FOR the Animals How to Speak FOR the Animals

How to Speak FOR the Animals

Apr 16, 2019

How to speak for the animals

Photo: @leafydragon, unsplash

Watch your Language

Because everyone’s listening

I must admit, I don’t always practice what I preach, especially when I open my mouth.

I’m a born and raised New Yorker with lots of hot blood flowing through my veins. I’ve moved a little along the East coast a bit and since 1995, have been living in Germany where it’s encouraged to talk about politics and tell someone what you honestly think whether they asked to hear it or not.

If I’ve learned anything from being around different cultures in my almost half-century life, it’s to remain as respectful as humanly possible even if a fire’s brewing inside because it’s the only way that people will listen.

I wrote about respectful communication in January because in this day and age of trolling on social media and with the political situations causing splits in many countries, we can sure use all the reminders we can get.

 

What does this have to do with animals?

Well, just recently a president called a group of people animals. That’s about as political as I’m going to get right now. This post is NOT about this president or this group of people.

What it is about is his use of the term ‘animal’.

Humans are animals. That’s a fact and I, for one, am happy to be one, so thank you, Mr. President, for telling the truth.

Problem is, he didn’t mean it like that.
He meant to insult this group by referring to them as ‘barbaric’.

Wait a minute, what species is he calling barbaric? Every single non-human animal species.

Say what? Now this only insults the non-human animals!

The ones who mind their own business.

But it’s the human race who’s ‘barbaric’ because we take full advantage of destroying things for our own benefit.

Many humans are trying to change things and for that, I’m grateful.

That’s also why I’m publishing the digital version of Lily Bowers and The Uninvited Guest on April 26: World Day for Laboratory Animals because I want to show the younger generation how important it is to respect nature and all animals, humans included. 

As soon as we’re mindful about how we talk about animals, can we start to speak FOR the animals.

How to Be Mindful

Being careful about the words you use and how you talk and write about animals may not seem that important, but this small shift makes a difference in the unconscious minds of others.

Since animals are living beings, not a material objects, I don’t refer to any animal as an ‘it’ but rather a he or she.

I use the word family when talking about wolves, not a pack. Not to humanize them, but that’s how they see themselves, living in a tight knit family where each member has an important job, something humans can relate to more than a pack anyway.

I was also looking for a new phrase for “kill two birds with one stone” and then Sabine Harnau, owner of From Scratch, retweeted this post below to me from peta and since we both agree, scones are not healthy for birds, I now say “Feed two birds with one banana” when I multitask.

Or ten birds, depending on the size of the birds and banana as one banana is very filling.

And I’ll “teach a vegan to farm”, never a man to fish.

The comments on this thread in Twitter are atrocious and unfortunately, that’s common with PETA’s posts because haters are gonna hate.

But not you as you are enlightened and respectful and for that, I’m truly grateful.

animal language

Respect All Animals

„As parents, we have the moral responsibility to keep the spirit of our children alive, healthy and happy. As humans, this extends to animals. Breaking the spirit of animals goes against all laws of nature and the universe.“

 

Do you want to read Lily Bowers and The Uninvited Guest?

 

Can you think of any other phrases to reformulate? Please comment below and let’s talk!

Peace and love,

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